News

The Swirl: February 1, 2016

Everyone wants to keep up with the latest and greatest ad news out there, but with busy schedules and content galore, we all know it's not as easy as it sounds. That's why we're serving up the Swirl every Monday to keep you in the know, without all the dirty work. Think a mix of insights, trends and really cool things we find each week, delivered right to your inbox before you've even had your morning coffee.

WORD OF THE WEEK 

Neuromarketing (n) - the study of neurological and biological reactions like heart rate, sweat, posture, facial reactions, and electrical brain pulses to advertisements and products. 

THE BRAIN TELLS ALL

Nielsen recently released a report that proves that consumer neuroscience can add to the strength of advertising. These little things called emotions influence our conscious behaviors and drive our nonconscious decisions. Spoiler alert: this kind of testing really isn't as expensive as you'd think it would be. #winning

WHY IT MATTERS

Because emotion = sales. Direct response surveys can be very misleading because they require people to rationalize their emotions as feelings. The difference? Emotions are our instinctive reactions to stimuli. Feelings are the mind's interpretation of those emotions, and are therefore subject to personal bias. Moral of the story: we can't trust ourselves to say how we really feel. So it's best left to the scientific pros. 

APPLIES MOST TO...

Everyone. Even if touchy feely doesn't seem possible for healthcare or financial services... the more in tune that brands are with consumer emotions, the more likely they will be to reap the fiscal benefits. Cha-ching. 

OLD IS THE NEW... NEW?

Grandma's car is cool again. Say what? Yep. NAPA Auto Parts launched a series of minute-long old car commercials, showing that ol' time vehicles can still be the stars of the highway... with lots of tender loving care.

WHY IT MATTERS

Let's face it. Clichés and parodies are a slippery slope when it comes to your brand image. But NAPA's spin off of new-car commercials is successful at balancing the irony without losing sight of the brand message. It's light-hearted, yet effective - plus who doesn't love a good laugh? 

APPLIES MOST TO...

The automotive industry.

IT HAPPENS TO THE BEST OF THEM, TOO

Last week, Coca-Cola decided to say 'bye Felicia' to its long standing slogan "Open Happiness" and 'hello' to "Taste the Feeling" in an attempt to unify the brand's dozens of products. In an effort to engage consumers, Coke also launched a GIF maker, allowing people to add customized text to the visual with their own feelings. As it turns out, not everyone 'tastes the feeling' the same way Coke does

WHY IT MATTERS

While Coke intended for people to share their feelings in an uplifting way, the lesson here remains the same. Positive or negative, the consumer will always control the message (and fast). It's impossible to control, but how you react and respond will ultimately determine the outcome.

APPLIES MOST TO...

Clients in the digital space. News online travels fast, so staying on top of conversation is key.

FINAL FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Can you imagine a world without decks? Check out what a few agencies are saying about kicking the PowerPoint habit.